Saplo is a new Swedish startup, which also got to the next round of Seedcamp. Tomorrow will tell if the company got to the final. The founder Mattias Tyrberg commented his plans and firm to Swedish press last week (another article).

Saplo has a software called AIAnalys, which according to Tyrberg can understand text in a similar way as humans do. It’s based on intelligent context analysis, meaning the software can value information automatically. It allows to get rid of slow manual work and problems with subjective judgment, like individual bias and systematic errors, in analysing and evaluating different kinds of texts. The software also enables analyzing huge pieces of text, which may have been impractical before. According to Tyrberg this kind of a product is of interest in many different areas, like media analysis, advertising, and web site optimization to name a few obvious ones.

The main benefits are the product saves money and it enables potentially more revenues. For example, with the technology one can measure exactly how positive or negative a person or firm is covered in media, and the program can show a graph with a comparison to another person or firm. One can also optimize ads with AIAnalys. Saplo web pages state results up to 70 % higher ad revenue can be achieved through presenting the right ads to the right reader, as AIAnalys can understand the text and present suitable ads accordingly. The software can also be used to tweak the whole user experience on a website, to make the users stay longer on the site by displaying similar content, which the user is interested in.

According to Mattias Tyrberg the technology is unique, even though there are some competitors in the sector. Saplo’s technology is based on several years of research, and Tyrberg’s final thesis, which he doesn’t want to turn in until the patent process allows for it. It seems there’s potential for a financing round later on as well, since Tyrberg mentions he’s especially looking forward to establishing risk financier contacts in London.

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