The 15 in Arctic15 stands for 15 finalists of the pitching competition. We will introduce them all over coming days in reverse alphabetical order. This is the first of the 15 articles.

Tebo aims to put everything teachers need to run their increasingly digital lessons into one place – removing the need for separate platforms and unifying analytics on students progress.

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For founder Tõnis Kusmin, 31, it is kind of a mission – he has thought a long time about establishing his own, private school in the countryside. He has stayed deep in the education sector since his studies and has launched several businesses to serve education system.

The team of serial entrepreneurs has raised first seed funding and is currently in the middle of Startup Chile accelerator programme, hoping to use it as a stepping stone to markets in Latin America, where is sees less competition than in English-speaking world, while the appetite for services like Tebo is high.

Since its first launch in Estonia (under opiveeb.ee brand), around 20% of
the country’s teachers have signed up and have so far uploaded more than 5,000 items to share. The usage numbers have surged in recent weeks after the team introduced quizzes and puzzles.

Focusing on serving the teachers it envisions becoming the primary outlet of teacher-created learning content on the internet, allowing all teachers to upload content, share it with students, and find new content from other teachers.

While many edtech startups approach the market through students, Tebo focused
on teachers, hoping that would enable faster growth of usage. The platform lets
teachers create and share any content – exercises, learning videos, games. It promises teachers can create learning games in
15 minutes. Students can open them in class with any Internet-connected device.

Tebo is playing in one the hottest sectors out there, with many startups already breaking
the bank with small, dedicated apps like Kahoot. It is inevitable that if their focus on teachers shows traction abroad Tebo will see massive competition, and they are yet to prove they can succeed beyond Estonia. Chile is a great second market – it’s clearly far enough culturally and geographically to prove scalability of the platform.

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