Two Swedish companies have partnered to improve conversions on mobile ads. Freespee, the mobile advertising “click-to-call” solution has partnered with, Tradedoubler, the internet advertising and marketing company founded in Sockholm in 1999. Tradedoubler has since moved headquarters to London, but have seen good growth. Today their network includes 140,000 website publishers and 2,000 advertisers.

It’s been a few months since we’ve covered Freespree, but they offers a pretty interesting click-to-call advertising solution which they claim helps increase conversions.

“The beauty of Freespee is we don’t have to reinvent the wheel – we can add clickable, trackable phone numbers to our desktop and mobile ad formats with just a couple of lines of code,” said Rob Wilson, CEO of Tradedoubler. “For a large segment of our advertisers this is incredibly valuable because these ads on average convert six times better than a traditional online or mobile display ad.”

Freespee isn’t the silver bullet solution for all types of advertising, but for services with local offices, like insurance, education, finance, health, utilities, and so on, they can help increase conversion. They cite that 70% of these consumers want to talk to someone before spending money.

“Especially when advertising on mobile phones, a call is the natural next step after seeing the ad – and we make that call just one click away and totally trackable for conversion optimisation,” says Carl Holmquist, Freespee founder and CEO.

As a greater emphasis is put on mobile, it wouldn’t be surprising to see Freespee in the news more often. According to their press release, Google reports that mobile users are 6 percent to 8 percent more likely to click on ads that contain a phone number. And, even when mobile users click through to a mobile landing page instead of the phone number, Google’s research found that 52 percent of those people go on to call the advertiser. They have to go after a smaller niche of advertisers, but that type of conversion monetizes.

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